Italy – Tuscany – Val d’Orcia – Orcia Valley – Podere Belverde in the morning mist by -lucie-

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Italy – Tuscany – Toscana – Val d’Orcia – Orcia Valley – UNESCO World Heritage Site – Typical view of the rolling hills – Historic, artistic & landscape area of extraordinary beauty – House in the country – Podere Belverde in the morning mist

Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II; Lens: 70.00 – 200.00 mm; Focal length: 75.00 mm; Aperture: 5.0; Exposure time: 1/250 s; ISO: 100

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All images are exclusive property and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transmitted, manipulated or used in any way without expressed, written permission of the photographer.

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carcará by fredmatos

The southern crested caracara (Caracara plancus), also known as the southern caracara or carancho, is a bird of prey in the family Falconidae. The classification of this species and name have evolved. It was formerly placed in the genus Polyborus. The use of the name formerly extended to two subspecies: the northern caracara (C. cheriway) of the southern United States, Mexico, Central America and northern South America, and the extinct Guadalupe caracara (C. lutosa) as subspecies. The use of the name southern caracara is now restricted to a bird that is found in central and southern South America.
It has a total length of 50–65 cm (20–26 in) and a wingspan of 120–132 cm (47–52 in). Weight is 0.9-1.6 kg (2-3.5 lbs), averaging 1,348 g (2.972 lb) in 7 birds from Tierra del Fuego. Individuals from the colder southern part of its range average larger than those from tropical regions (as predicted by Bergmann’s rule) and are the largest type of caracara. In fact, they are the second largest species of falcon in the world by mean body mass, second only to the gyrfalcon. The cap, belly, thighs, most of the wings and tail-tip are dark brownish, the auriculars, throat and nape are whitish-buff, and the chest, neck, mantle, back, uppertail-coverts, crissum and basal part of the tail are whitish-buff barred dark brownish. In flight, the outer primaries show a large conspicuous whitish-buff patch (‘window’), as in several other species of caracaras. The legs are yellow and the bare facial skin and cere are deep yellow to reddish-orange. Juveniles resemble adults, but are paler, with streaking on the chest, neck and back, grey legs, and whitish, later pinkish-purple, facial skin and cere.
It can be separated from the similar northern caracara by its more extensive barring on the chest, brownish and often lightly mottled/barred scapulars (all blackish in northern), and pale lower back with dark barring (uniform blackish in northern). Individuals showing intermediate features are known from the small area of contact in north-central Brazil, but intergradation between the two species is generally limited.
A bold, opportunistic raptor, the southern crested caracara is often seen walking around on the ground looking for food. It mainly feeds on carcasses of dead animals, but will steal food from other raptors, raid bird nests, and take live prey if the possibility arises (mostly insects or other small prey, but at least up to the size of a snowy egret). It is dominant over the black and turkey vulture at carcasses. It is typically solitary, but several individuals may gather at a large food source (e.g. dumps). Breeding takes place in the austral spring/summer in the southern part of its range, but timing is less strict in warmer regions. The nest is a large open structure, typically placed on the top of a tree or palm, but sometimes on the ground. Average clutch size is two eggs.

Text taken from Wikipedia

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caracara on the roof by fredmatos

The southern crested caracara (Caracara plancus), also known as the southern caracara or carancho, is a bird of prey in the family Falconidae. The classification of this species and name have evolved. It was formerly placed in the genus Polyborus. The use of the name formerly extended to two subspecies: the northern caracara (C. cheriway) of the southern United States, Mexico, Central America and northern South America, and the extinct Guadalupe caracara (C. lutosa) as subspecies. The use of the name southern caracara is now restricted to a bird that is found in central and southern South America.
It has a total length of 50–65 cm (20–26 in) and a wingspan of 120–132 cm (47–52 in). Weight is 0.9-1.6 kg (2-3.5 lbs), averaging 1,348 g (2.972 lb) in 7 birds from Tierra del Fuego. Individuals from the colder southern part of its range average larger than those from tropical regions (as predicted by Bergmann’s rule) and are the largest type of caracara. In fact, they are the second largest species of falcon in the world by mean body mass, second only to the gyrfalcon. The cap, belly, thighs, most of the wings and tail-tip are dark brownish, the auriculars, throat and nape are whitish-buff, and the chest, neck, mantle, back, uppertail-coverts, crissum and basal part of the tail are whitish-buff barred dark brownish. In flight, the outer primaries show a large conspicuous whitish-buff patch (‘window’), as in several other species of caracaras. The legs are yellow and the bare facial skin and cere are deep yellow to reddish-orange. Juveniles resemble adults, but are paler, with streaking on the chest, neck and back, grey legs, and whitish, later pinkish-purple, facial skin and cere.
It can be separated from the similar northern caracara by its more extensive barring on the chest, brownish and often lightly mottled/barred scapulars (all blackish in northern), and pale lower back with dark barring (uniform blackish in northern). Individuals showing intermediate features are known from the small area of contact in north-central Brazil, but intergradation between the two species is generally limited.
A bold, opportunistic raptor, the southern crested caracara is often seen walking around on the ground looking for food. It mainly feeds on carcasses of dead animals, but will steal food from other raptors, raid bird nests, and take live prey if the possibility arises (mostly insects or other small prey, but at least up to the size of a snowy egret). It is dominant over the black and turkey vulture at carcasses. It is typically solitary, but several individuals may gather at a large food source (e.g. dumps). Breeding takes place in the austral spring/summer in the southern part of its range, but timing is less strict in warmer regions. The nest is a large open structure, typically placed on the top of a tree or palm, but sometimes on the ground. Average clutch size is two eggs.
Text taken from Wikipedia

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carcará by fredmatos

The southern crested caracara (Caracara plancus), also known as the southern caracara or carancho, is a bird of prey in the family Falconidae. The classification of this species and name have evolved. It was formerly placed in the genus Polyborus. The use of the name formerly extended to two subspecies: the northern caracara (C. cheriway) of the southern United States, Mexico, Central America and northern South America, and the extinct Guadalupe caracara (C. lutosa) as subspecies. The use of the name southern caracara is now restricted to a bird that is found in central and southern South America.

It has a total length of 50–65 cm (20–26 in) and a wingspan of 120–132 cm (47–52 in). Weight is 0.9-1.6 kg (2-3.5 lbs), averaging 1,348 g (2.972 lb) in 7 birds from Tierra del Fuego. Individuals from the colder southern part of its range average larger than those from tropical regions (as predicted by Bergmann’s rule) and are the largest type of caracara. In fact, they are the second largest species of falcon in the world by mean body mass, second only to the gyrfalcon. The cap, belly, thighs, most of the wings and tail-tip are dark brownish, the auriculars, throat and nape are whitish-buff, and the chest, neck, mantle, back, uppertail-coverts, crissum and basal part of the tail are whitish-buff barred dark brownish. In flight, the outer primaries show a large conspicuous whitish-buff patch (‘window’), as in several other species of caracaras. The legs are yellow and the bare facial skin and cere are deep yellow to reddish-orange. Juveniles resemble adults, but are paler, with streaking on the chest, neck and back, grey legs, and whitish, later pinkish-purple, facial skin and cere.

It can be separated from the similar northern caracara by its more extensive barring on the chest, brownish and often lightly mottled/barred scapulars (all blackish in northern), and pale lower back with dark barring (uniform blackish in northern). Individuals showing intermediate features are known from the small area of contact in north-central Brazil, but intergradation between the two species is generally limited.

A bold, opportunistic raptor, the southern crested caracara is often seen walking around on the ground looking for food. It mainly feeds on carcasses of dead animals, but will steal food from other raptors, raid bird nests, and take live prey if the possibility arises (mostly insects or other small prey, but at least up to the size of a snowy egret). It is dominant over the black and turkey vulture at carcasses. It is typically solitary, but several individuals may gather at a large food source (e.g. dumps). Breeding takes place in the austral spring/summer in the southern part of its range, but timing is less strict in warmer regions. The nest is a large open structure, typically placed on the top of a tree or palm, but sometimes on the ground. Average clutch size is two eggs.

Text taken from Wikipedia

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dune at the river mouth by fredmatos

Traveling, meeting other cities, new landscapes, cultural and different customs of my people and their stories, their projects, their dreams. This is my hobby, in which the picture is integrated as an accomplice, as a justification, like a third eye, also as an instrument through which I can relive every moment lived outside of my daily life.

Some images appeal to me just by the way, by the traces, the contrast between the volumes, colors, light.

This is a simple image recorded on my most recent trip to the mouth of the São Francisco River in northeastern Brazil: a couple down the sand dune, a woman and a child up. I prefer that there were large clouds in the sky, but there was. As I said is a simple image, almost minimalist, it may be precisely why I liked it.

I hope you also enjoy.

Good weekend for all.

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dune by fredmatos

Attention friends:

A few minutes ago I was surprised by the layout change. The first thing I noticed was that hinders the comments. Also, I see that I will have difficulty with navigation. I will try to adapt, if you can not have to leave the 500px. Just a change so made me leave the Flickr and come here.
Thank you all.

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